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About Harrogate

Harrogate Today:

Central Harrogate is bounded by ‘the Stray’ or ‘Two Hundred acres’ to the south and west and borders High Harrogate and the Duchy estate to the east and north, respectively. It is a district centre for retail and the Victoria Shopping Centre houses several major chains. Pedestrianised Cambridge Street and Oxford Street are the main high streets, and Harrogate Theatre is on Oxford Street. Parliament Street, Montpellier and James Street offer designer shopping and upmarket department stores. An Odeon cinema is located on the edge of central Harrogate, as are Asda and Waitrose supermarkets. Marks and Spencer have a large food hall in its store on Oxford Street. Several bars and restaurants can be found on Cheltenham Crescent and John Street, while the Royal Baths and Parliament Street are at the centre of the town’s nightlife. The southern end of central Harrogate consists largely of detached houses that have been converted to offices, although Harrogate Magistrates’ Court and Harrogate Central Library can be found on Victoria Avenue. Some upmarket boutiques are situated along the Stray in central southern Harrogate. Oatlands is a wealthy area in the south of Harrogate. It includes two schools, Oatlands Primary School and Oatlands Infant School, and some allotments.

Woodlands is a large area in south-east Harrogate which adjoins Starbeck/Knaresborough Road. It is home to Harrogate Town F.C., Willow Tree Primary School, Morrisons and Sainsbury’s supermarkets as well as the Woodlands pub.

It’s Official – Harrogate is a Happy Town

According to a recent Rightmove survey, published on 4 December 2019, Harrogate is the second happiest place to live in the UK. Having clinched the top spot in previous years, it cannot be disputed that Harrogate is, indeed, a fabulous place in which to live and work. The Rightmove surveys are based on responses from local residents, and it would appear that Harrogate folk are in love with their town!

From beautiful, open spaces including the fabulous Stray and Valley Gardens to the stunning architecture of the Royal Hall and Turkish Baths, it is easy to see the appeal of this Victorian spa town.

Adorned with many a café and restaurant and host to growing international businesses, Harrogate is a town that has something for everyone. Whether you fancy a delectable afternoon tea at the famous Bettys or a glass of champagne at Gino D’Acampo’s rooftop terrace-bar, the town caters to all tastes.

It is elegant, buzzing and thriving.

The Harrogate Guide For Locals

At The Harrogate Guide, we are passionate about promoting all this gem of a town has to offer. We provide information about places to visit, local events, news stories, job opportunities and more. Whatever you need; you’ll find it in our guide.

For locals, it’s a ‘one-stop-shop’ to all that is happening right now in the town. You will find information about upcoming events (such as the Tour de Yorkshire 2020) alongside local interest stories. The contactless payment terminal that was set up outside Marks and Spencer on Oxford Street, to help those sleeping rough, is an example of a news story we recently featured. You can read about it here.

The Harrogate Guide for Visitors

The Harrogate Guide serves not only the people of Harrogate but also those looking to visit and spend time in the town. There is an abundance of information on the best places to explore and where to rest your head for the night.

Harrogate attracts over 200,000 visitors a year, not only through its reputation as a beautiful place to visit but because of the array of events on offer. The International Convention Centre puts on trade shows, concerts, comedy stand-ups, fairs, exhibitions and entertainment all year round. Harrogate also has an excellent reputation for hosting international sporting events such as the Tour de Yorkshire and more, recently, the UCI Road World Championships. The UCI event was seen by a TV audience of 250 million.

Supporting Local Businesses

At The Harrogate Guide, we work hard to support Harrogate businesses, events and good causes by championing them across our social media channels and on our website. By supporting you, we are boosting our community and attracting more visitors who support our local economy.

If you are a local business, then get registered with us today, and you’ll soon see your name up in lights!

The Harrogate Guide works for everyone: residents, businesses and visitors. Isn’t it time you took a look?

Maps of Harrogate:

Click Here for Walking, Cycling & Running routes

Click Here for Yorkshire Tourism Maps

Click Here for the Map of the Harrogate County in 1832

Click Here for Harrogate Post Codes Maps

Click Here for more about the Yorkshire Dales

Click Here for facts about the Vale of York

HARROGATE STRAY

The Stray is a long area of public parkland in the centre of Harrogate, North Yorkshire, comprising 200 acres of contiguous open land linking the spa town’s curative springs and wells. The contiguous area of land, not all of which are officially designated part of The Stray, forms an approximately U-shaped belt from the Cenotaph on the North-West point of the U, down the A61, along a broader southern belt of fields, enclosing the building of Church Square, and up to the North East tip of the U at The Granby. The Stray includes the site of Tewit Well, marked by a dome.

The Stray is famous for being one of the top landmarks in Harrogate, it has over 200 acres of grass parkland that gives the town a fantastic green appearance, it also gives a space which the public can use for games, walks and relaxation. With a good variety of food and drink shops nearby ensures you have all you need to enjoy some relaxing time out of the town but only by minutes Apart from kite flying and ball games it also has football pitches for local teams and enjoys a visit from a funfair twice a year as well as a bonfire in November. The Stray is protected by an act of parliament and its total area has to remain. So should any of it is ever be removed it then has to be replaced elsewhere, this ensures that this wonderful public space public space will remain at the heart of the town.

The area of the Stray was historically part of the Forest of Knaresborough, a royal hunting forest which passed into the hands of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster, in 1369. The forest remained in the hands of the Duchy of Lancaster, which still owns the freehold of the Stray. By the 18th century, the forest had long outlived its original purpose, and the spa town of Harrogate was growing within the forest. The Duchy became concerned at illegal encroachments on its land and considered enclosure of the forest. The Duchy commissioned a survey in 1767, which resulted in an Act of Enclosure in 1770. The commissioners’ subsequent survey recognised the value of the unenclosed land which gave visitors unhindered access to the various mineral springs around Harrogate, and their Great Award of 1778 set aside two hundred acres to be forever unenclosed. The Award ensured the public right of access to the land linking the wells and dedicating a long stretch of land for those seeking the cure to walk and exercise in.

The Award allotted grazing rights or gates on the unenclosed land so that animals on the 200 acres were free to stray without a tether, giving rise to the popular name for the land, the Stray (a term used elsewhere in Yorkshire for unenclosed lands, such as at York and Redcar. Neither the Act of Enclosure nor the Award made any provision for ongoing management of the Stray. In 1841 a new Act of Parliament, the Harrogate Improvement Act, established a committee of Stray gate owners, but in practice, this enabled the gate owners to generate income from renting parts of the Stray for purposes other than grazing animals. In 1884 Harrogate was incorporated as a municipal borough, and the new corporation negotiated the purchase of the gates. A further Act of Parliament in 1893 required the corporation to maintain the Stray as a public open space.

In 1932 the corporation’s action in planting large formal areas planted with shrubs provoked opposition and led in 1933 to the formation of the Stray Defence Association. Another Act of Parliament, the Harrogate Stray Act 1985, made the new Harrogate Borough Council the protector of the Stray, and permitted the use of up to 8.5 acres of the Stray for spectator events. A variation was granted for the Tour de France in 2014, but proposals in 2016 to relax the restrictions permanently met opposition and were abandoned. The Stray is traditionally the site of parades and civic events. For example, at the Golden Jubilee of Queen Victoria in 1887 the people of Harrogate roasted an ox for the occasion and drank 500 gallons of beer. During World War II trenches were dug on The Stray in fear that German planes might use the open land as a runway.

The Stray in Springtime - Picture of The Stray, Harrogate ... The Stray, Harrogate Crocuses on... - Welcome to Yorkshire ...The Stray in Springtime - Picture of The Stray, Harrogate ...Harrogate | The West Park

Pictures from https://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/LocationPhotoDirectLink-g187046-d4742185-i117294380-The_Stray- anHarrogate_North_Yorkshire_England.html  /  https://www.facebook.com/welcometoyorkshire/photos/-the-stray-harrogatecrocuses-on-harrogate-stray-one-of-our-absolutely-favourite-/10157292583343469/ and https://www.thewestparkhotel.com/about/harrogate/

Harrogate is a spa town in North Yorkshire, the town is a tourist destination and its visitor attractions include its spa waters and RHS Harlow Carr gardens. Harrogate grew out of two smaller settlements, High Harrogate and Low Harrogate, in the 17th century. In 20013, 2014 & 2015 it was voted the happiest place to live.

Harrogate spa water contains iron, sulphur and common salt. The town became known as ‘The English Spa’ in the Georgian era, after its waters were discovered in the 16th century. In the 17th and 18th centuries its ‘chalybeate’ waters (containing iron) were a popular health treatment.

Harrogate railway station and Harrogate bus station in the town centre provide transport connections. Leeds Bradford Airport is 10 miles away. The main roads through the town are the A61, connecting Harrogate to Leeds and Ripon, and the A59, connecting the town to York and Skipton. Harrogate is also connected to Wetherby and the A1(M) by the A661, while the A658 from Bradford forms a bypass around the south of the town.

A Guide for Harrogate North Yorkshire. Everything about Harrogate North Yorkshire All In One Place. History of Harrogate

It’s Official – Harrogate is a Happy Town. According to a recent Rightmove survey, published on 4 December 2019, Harrogate is the second happiest place to live in the UK. Having clinched the top spot in previous years, it cannot be disputed that Harrogate is, indeed, a fabulous place in which to live and work. The Rightmove surveys are based on responses from local residents, and it would appear that Harrogate folk are in love with their town!

From beautiful, open spaces including the fabulous Stray and Valley Gardens to the stunning architecture of the Royal Hall and Turkish Baths, it is easy to see the appeal of this Victorian spa town. Adorned with many a café and restaurant and host to growing international businesses, Harrogate is a town that has something for everyone. Whether you fancy a delectable afternoon tea at the famous Bettys or a glass of champagne at Gino D’Acampo’s rooftop terrace-bar, the town caters to all tastes. It is elegant, buzzing and thriving.

The Harrogate Guide For Locals

At The Harrogate Guide, we are passionate about promoting all this gem of a town has to offer. We provide information about places to visit, local events, news stories, job opportunities and more. Whatever you need; you’ll find it in our guide. For locals, it’s a ‘one-stop-shop’ to all that is happening right now in the town. You will find information about upcoming events (such as the Tour de Yorkshire 2020) alongside local interest stories. The contactless payment terminal that was set up outside Marks and Spencer on Oxford Street, to help those sleeping rough, is an example of a news story we recently featured. You can read about it here.

The Harrogate Guide for Visitors

The Harrogate Guide serves not only the people of Harrogate but also those looking to visit and spend time in the town. There is an abundance of information on the best places to explore and where to rest your head for the night. Harrogate attracts over 200,000 visitors a year, not only through its reputation as a beautiful place to visit but because of the array of events on offer. The International Convention Centre puts on trade shows, concerts, comedy stand-ups, fairs, exhibitions and entertainment all year round. Harrogate also has an excellent reputation for hosting international sporting events such as the Tour de Yorkshire and more, recently, the UCI Road World Championships. The UCI event was seen by a TV audience of 250 million.

Supporting Local Businesses

At The Harrogate Guide, we work hard to support Harrogate businesses, events and good causes by championing them across our social media channels and on our website. By supporting you, we are boosting our community and attracting more visitors who support our local economy.

If you are a local business, then get registered with us today, and you’ll soon see your name up in lights! The Harrogate Guide works for everyone: residents, businesses and visitors. Isn’t it time you took a look?  To reister just Click Here

 

The History below is that I have researched on the internet and in libraries and hopefully correct, however, history sometimes differs in the views of different historians. Should you find any errors, anything I might have missed or indeed anything  I can include or research please email info@harrogate guide.co.uk

History of Harrogate:  The name Harrogate is first attested in the 1330s as Harwegate, Harougat and Harrowgate. The origin of the name is uncertain. It may derive from Old Norse hrgr ‘a heap of stones, cairn’, gata ‘street’, in which case the name presumably meant ‘road to the cairn’. Another possibility is that the name means “the way to Harlow”. The form Harlowgate is known from 1518 and was apparently in the court rolls of Edward II.

In medieval times Harrogate was a place on the borders of the township of Bilton with Harrogate in the ancient Parish of Knaresborough, and the parish of Pannal, also known as Beckwith with Rossett. The part within the township of Bilton developed into the community of High Harrogate, and the part within Pannal developed into the community of Low Harrogate. Both communities were within the Royal Forest of Knaresborough. In 1372 King Edward III granted the Royal Forest to his son John, Duke of Lancaster (also known as John of Gaunt), and the Duchy of Lancaster became the principal landowner in Harrogate.

In the 17th century, Harrogate began to change from a little hamlet into a Spa Town, it was at the end of the 16th century that a traveller drank from a well in Harrogate, this traveller had been to many spas and noticed that the water in the well tasted like spa water. In those days people believed drinking and bathing in spa water could heal sickness and he spread the word and that was when Harrogate slowly became a spa town.

The first well to be found was Tewitt Well In 1596 a traveller called Slingsby discovered that water from Stray, a common in Harrogate, possessed similar properties to that at Spa in Belgium. He named the well Tewit, after a local word for peewit or lapwing, a bird which still frequently flocks on the Stray common. Tewit Well saw fewer visitors than the wells in Low Harrogate, or even St John’s Well in High Harrogate, because of its distance from Victorian hotels and lodging houses. In 1842 the structure enclosing the Royal Pump Room, which sits over the Old Sulphur Well, was replaced by a new structure designed by Isaac Shutt for the Improvement Commissioners. The old structure was then moved to Tewitt Well. Local youth brass band ‘The Tewit Youth Band’ is named after this landmark.

Harrogate increased in size in the 1600s when Dr Michael Stanhope discovered a second well, St John’s Well. The medicinal properties of the waters were publicised by Edmund Deane. His book, Spadacrene Anglica, or the English Spa Fountain was published in 1626.

In the 17th and 18th centuries further chalybeate springs were discovered in High Harrogate, and both chalybeate and sulphur springs were found in Low Harrogate. The two communities attracted many visitors. A number of inns were opened for visitors in High Harrogate in the 17th century (the Queen’s Head, the Granby, the Dragon and the World’s End. In Low Harrogate, the Crown was open by the mid-18th century, and possibly earlier.

In the early 1700s, Harrogate was still growing and people bathed in a sulphur well which was known locally as the stinking well. And then later that century inns were built to give visitors accommodation. A further well named Magnesia Well was discovered in the late 1800s and the Royal Baths opened in 1897. Towards the end of the 1800s, a lot of the public land was taken over by residents and enclosed, however, later 200 acres became public land. In 1831 the population was approximately 4000. In accordance with an Enclosure Act of 1770, promoted by the Duchy of Lancaster, the Royal Forest of Knaresborough was enclosed. The enclosure award of 1778 clarified ownership of land in the Harrogate area. Under the award 200 acres of land, which included the springs known at that time, were reserved as a public common, The Stray, which has remained public open space. The Enclosure Award facilitated development around the Stray. During the 19th century, the area between High Harrogate and Low Harrogate, which until then had remained separate communities a mile apart, was developed, and what is now the central area of Harrogate was built on high ground overlooking Low Harrogate. An area to the north of the developing town was reserved to the Duchy of Lancaster and was developed for residential building.

To provide entertainment for the increasing numbers of visitors the Georgian Theatre was built in 1788. Bath Hospital (later the Royal Bath Hospital) was built in 1826. The Royal Pump Room was built in 1842. The site of Tewit Well is marked by a dome on the Stray. Other wells can be found in the Valley Gardens and Royal Pump Room Museum. Harrogate got its first piped water in 1846 followed by gaslighting in 1847, and in 1848 a Railway Station was built which increased the number of visitors considerably. Then in 1884 Harrogate got its first Mayor, followed in 1887 by a Public Library and in electricity was delivered to Harrogate in 1897. In 1893 Harrogate doctor George Oliver was the first to observe the effect of adrenaline on the circulation.

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Harrogate was popular among the English élite and frequented by nobility from mainland Europe]. Its popularity declined after the First World War. During the Second World War, Harrogate’s large hotels accommodated government offices evacuated from London paving the way for the town to become a commercial, conference, and exhibition centre.

Former employers in the town were the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB), the Milk Marketing Board and ICI who occupied offices and laboratories at Hornbeam Park where Crimplene was invented in the 1950s and named after the nearby Crimple Valley and beck.

In 2007, two metal detectorists found the Harrogate hoard, a 10th-century Viking treasure hoard, near Harrogate. The hoard contains almost 700 coins and other items from as far away as Afghanistan. The hoard was described by the British Museum as the most important find of its type in Britain for 150 years.

Harrogate Theatre opened in 1900. A War Memorial was built in 1923. The Sun Pavilion and colonnade was built in 1933. The Royal Pump Room became a museum in 1953. For a short time, the NHS sent people to the Royal Baths for a cure.

Stonefall Cemetery, Harrogate is the final resting place of around 1 000 servicemen and women, including over 600 Canadians, who died in the First and Second World Wars. They lie under the care of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) which honours the 1.7 million men and women of the Commonwealth forces who lost their lives in both world wars and ensures they will never be forgotten. Find out more and download a self-guided tour here: Harrogate (Stonefall) Cemetery | CWGC

Harrogate Today:

Central Harrogate is bounded by ‘the Stray’ or ‘Two Hundred acres’ to the south and west and borders High Harrogate and the Duchy estate to the east and north respectively. It is a district centre for retail and the Victoria Shopping Centre houses several major chains. Pedestrianised Cambridge Street and Oxford Street are the main high streets, and Harrogate Theatre is on Oxford Street. Parliament Street, Montpellier and James Street offer designer shopping and upmarket department stores. An Odeon cinema is located on the edge of central Harrogate, as are Asda and Waitrose supermarkets. Marks and Spencer have a large food hall in its store on Oxford Street. Several bars and restaurants can be found on Cheltenham Crescent and John Street, while the Royal Baths and Parliament Street are at the centre of the town’s nightlife. The southern end of central Harrogate consists largely of detached houses that have been converted to offices, although Harrogate Magistrates’ Court and Harrogate Central Library can be found on Victoria Avenue. Some upmarket boutiques are situated along the Stray in central southern Harrogate. Oatlands is a wealthy area in the south of Harrogate. It includes two schools, Oatlands Primary School and Oatlands Infant School, and some allotments.

Woodlands is a large area in south-east Harrogate which adjoins Starbeck/Knaresborough Road. It is home to Harrogate Town F.C., Willow Tree Primary School, Morrisons and Sainsbury’s supermarkets as well as the Woodlands pub.

Bilton

Is a large area of Harrogate with many churches, stores and schools. It has several schools, Richard Taylor School, Woodfield and Bilton Grange. Poets’ Corner is known for its ‘poetic’ street names and expensive housing. Bilton was first recorded (as Billeton) in the Domesday Book in 1086. The name is of Old English origin and means farmstead of a man named Billa.

Bilton was historically in the parish of Knaresborough in the West Riding of Yorkshire. It formed a township with Harrogate, and in 1866 the township of Bilton with Harrogate became a civil parish. When Harrogate became a municipal borough in 1894, Bilton remained outside the borough and became a separate civil parish. In 1896, Starbeck was separated from Bilton to form a new civil parish. In 1938 the civil parish was abolished, and most of Bilton was added to Harrogate.

In 1848 the Leeds and Thirsk Railway was opened through Bilton, although no station was built there. The line crossed the River Nidd on the northern boundary of Bilton by a stone viaduct. In 1908 a narrow gauge railway was constructed from the main line to carry coal to the gas works next to the Little Wonder roundabout. The line was closed in 1956, and with the tracks having been removed the only remains of the line are some walls and the tunnels that carried the trains. A small museum was opened in the neighbouring New Park School, where the line used to come out above ground. Between 2007 and 2008 the school created a garden, known as “The Secret Railway Garden”, to commemorate the line. The area of Bilton west of the railway line was developed in the 19th and 20th centuries. The parish church of St John, designed by Gilbert Scott, was built between 1851 and 1857. It is now a Grade II* listed building. The area east of the railway has remained rural, with scattered houses now known as Old Bilton. Bilton Hall, east of Old Bilton, was once a hunting lodge built on the orders of John O’Gaunt in 1380. It later belonged to William  (who discovered the first spa well in Harrogate). The building was rebuilt in 1853 and is now a care home. It lies on a hill facing Knaresborough.

The main railway line through Bilton was closed in 1969.[11] In 2013 it was reopened as a cycleway and bridleway known as the Nidderdale Greenway. On the first May bank holiday each year, the Bilton Gala takes place. The first gala was held in 1977 and the event raises money for local groups and organisations.

Jennyfields

Jennyfields is a large, modern area in the north west of Harrogate, it has two schools, Saltergate Infant School and Saltergate Primary School. The town’s main public swimming pool is located on the edge of Jennyfield.

The Duchy estate is an affluent area close to central Harrogate where most houses are large detached homes or large detached homes converted into flats. There are several private schools, notably Harrogate Ladies’ College. There is a golf club and open countryside for walking.

Starbeck

Starbeck is a large area to the east of Harrogate with a railway station with trains to elsewhere in Harrogate on to Leeds, Knaresborough and York. A frequent bus service links Starbeck to Harrogate and Knaresborough. A number of schools, churches and shops are situated in Starbeck.

Pannal

Pannal is to the south of Harrogate, off the A61 road. It retains much of its village character. A commuter station links it to Harrogate and on to York, Knaresborough and Leeds.

High & Low Harrogate

High Harrogate is an inner section to the east of the town centre. It is focused on Westmoreland Street and the A59 Skipton Road, where a number of shops and cafés are located. Expensive terraced houses line the Stray, which stops in High Harrogate.

Low Harrogate is an inner section to the west of the town centre. It is the focus of most tourist activity in the town, with the Royal Pump Room, Mercer Art Gallery and the Valley Gardens.

Harlow Hill

Harlow Hill is a district to the west of the town, accessed by Otley Road. It has a number of new developments and an office park. It is known for RHS Harlow Carr Gardens. Harrogate Spa bottling plant is on Harlow Hill, as is a water treatment centre.

New Park

New Park is a small area to the north of Harrogate with a primary school. There are a number of terraced houses and some light industrial and commercial premises.

Wheatlands

Wheatlands is a wealthy district south of the Stray. It is residential and has two schools, St Aidan’s and St John Fisher’s.

Killinghall

 

The village is situated approximately 3 miles (5 km) north of Harrogate, extending south from the bridges on the A61 road over the River Nidd. The undeveloped area between Killinghall and Harrogate is known as Killinghall Moor some of which has been developed into Jenny Fields Estate. The village of Ripley lies 1 mile (1.6 km) to the north and Hampsthwaite 2 miles to the west. Killinghall’s position on the A61 links the village to Harrogate and Ripon. A regular bus service between Ripon, Harrogate and Leeds stops in Killinghall. Killinghall is primarily a commuter village, with one public house, the Three Horseshoes. The former Greyhound pub is closed. Within the parish but outside the village are two others: The Nelson and the Old Spring Well – formerly the Travellers’ Rest), a primary school, the Church of St Thomas, a Methodist chapel, a children’s day nursery, doctor’s office and a garden centre with a nursery. The local area incorporates a number of farms.

The village dates back before the Norman conquest of England, in fact, there is evidence that it dates back to Celtic times. In the Domesday Book, the village is called Chenihalle, i.e. Kennelhall; probably a place where the hounds (which belonged to the Lord of the Manor) were kept. A nobleman in the county of Yorkshire had the power granted to him by one of the Saxon kings to keep Mastiff dogs for chasing wolves out of their territory. The name has also been suggested as deriving from Chillingehal, which means the place of Cylla’s people in Old English. In the 17th century, early settlers acquired land in the Hollins Hall site of Lund Lane. Known at that time as Year with Hollins, this was settled by 25 families; the site was chosen because it was inter common with Killinghall and Hampsthwaite, which meant it was not possessed by either village. The Yeoman held plots of land of various sizes between Hollins Hall and Hollins Farm and records show that five of the families were named Hardisty. These early settlements helped create the village. There were also rich families that used to live in the village such as the Pulleyns, Tancreds, and Bayns who all erected manor houses that have since been reduced to grassy steps and sometimes built over.

During the English Civil War, after the Battle of Marston Moor in July 1644, Cromwell’s Norwich Troop of horses were quartered at Killinghall Village. The oldest building in the area is the Kennel Hall farm. This building (according to the plaque that commemorates it) was used to house Parliamentary soldiers from Cromwell regiment. The buildings date back only to the 17th century when the village was being largely rebuilt. Killinghall grew up as a river crossing over the River Nidd where a new bridge now stands (this was also a popular spot with many artists), but Killinghall found a new reputation with its quarries. The quarries have extracted their last lumps years ago, but many stone cutting businesses still exist in the area. A reminder of this is the lump of stone in the glebe that was quarried from the area. This stone also helped make many of Harrogate’s structures. On 5 July 2014, the Tour de France Stage 1 from Leeds to Harrogate passed through the village.

Knox

Knox in the olden days (credit for this information is due to Alan Gould and the Bilton Historical Society)

The name Knox most probably originates from the Old English “cnocc” or the similar sounding Scots Gaelic “cnoc” meaning a round topped hill, hillock or hump. Hence Knox Hill, the wooded, quarried summit between the A61 Ripon Road and Knox Lane. Prior to 1850 there was little to see at Knox besides a corn mill, a packhorse bridge and a couple of houses. The corn mill on Knox Mill Lane, which still retains its waterwheel, was most probably built in the first half of the 18th century as the mill house fireplace is inscribed with the year 1745. The mill was obviously a successful and profitable enterprise because John Oliver, who was the mill owner towards the end of the 18th century, also owned land at Church Square.

Spruisty Bridge is somewhat older than the mill, having been built in the 17th century to carry packhorse traffic across the Oak Beck. The ford most probably predates the bridge and it is reputed that the public right of way from Killinghall, through the ford and along Knox Lane, was used by the Cistercian monks of Fountains Abbey. This could be true as the route is an old one leading from the Abbey’s lands near Ripley and continuing through to the south of Bilton where the Abbey had more granges. The importance of this route makes it perfectly feasible that either, or both, of James I and Charles I used the bridge to cross the Oak Beck on their journeys south. If the bridge was only constructed in the 17th century then it is perhaps more likely that Charles I used it in 1646 rather than James I in 1603.

By 1850, Knox was comprised of the corn mill, a couple of houses on the north side of Knox Mill Lane together with some small quarries and the bridge keeper’s house, which was demolished in about 1900. Knox Lane, or Old Trough Lane as it was known at that time, only had a single building on it as you climbed up away from the river before reaching Knox House Farm, the current Knox pub. Knox Hill Farm, which overlooks the Ripon Road, is the only surviving farm from this period. The other farms in the area, Knox Farm and Hill Top (or Red Cat) Farm were demolished in the second half of the 20th century to make way for new housing developments. They were located at the eastern ends of Knox Grove and Redhill Close respectively.

There were further developments by the end of the Victorian period with the building of the rows of cottages on the northern side of Knox Lane close to the river, together with William Woods’ bleach works. Woods had a protracted legal dispute with the Harrogate Improvement Commissioners between 1867–1876 claiming damages and compensation because the quality of his bleached linen was being impacted by the sewage contaminated waters of Oak Beck. Woods eventually won his case, but by which time he had closed down his bleach yard, and Harrogate also improved its sewage treatment facilities. The land between the cottages and the bleach yard later became Pettinger’s market garden.

Before the start of World War 1 further developments had taken place in the area. More cottages were built between the mill and the bridge on the north side of Knox Mill Lane and Spruisty Bridge House, the bridge keeper’s house, had been demolished to be replaced by Sunny Bank House (now known as Moorland Court).  Old Trough Lane changed its name to Knox Lane and the narrow gauge Barber Line was constructed from the main line coal sidings at Bilton Junction, crossing over Knox Lane near where the current Knox Sawmills are located, before entering a tunnelled section under the hillside and finally emerging at the Harrogate Gas Works at New Park.

There then followed a period of stability before the post-World War 2 major housing developments began. Initially, houses were built along the south side of Knox Lane from the Knox Sawmills, which was established in 1952, up to the junction with Crab Lane and Bachelor Gardens. The Barber Line closed in 1958 and the bridge was removed, though the abutments still remain. The construction of the Knox and Redhill estates, between Knox Lane and Skipton Road, was undertaken around 1970 and finally the Kebbell estate on the north side of Knox Lane was built about 10 years later.

Pettinger’s nursery, whose greenhouses suffered a lot of damage during a great hailstorm in July 1968, has closed, as has the little shop in the Knox Lane cottage nearest the Oak Beck. It had been run by Mrs Duffield and later taken over by Mrs I. Smith and featured a large enamel Brooke Bond Tea advertising sign above the door. The ford too has been closed to traffic since the 1980s. This was perhaps for the best, as it had been a common site to see a vehicle, on one occasion even an ambulance, stranded in the middle of the river.

The Knox Valley Residents Association was formed in the early 1980s and one of its initial remits was to oppose the conversion of the Knox House Farm and barn into a pub. An action which failed, perhaps now fortuitously, since its function room has been used by several organisations, including the Association.

Bilton

Bilton Historical Society was formed in 1996 to record, investigate and promote an awareness of Bilton’s heritage and future, to unravel the secrets of Bilton’s past, its people, buildings, railways, industry, the royal hunting park and a lost way of life. The Society has successfully completed three Community Archaeology Projects supported by grants from the Local Heritage Initiative.

CHAPTER 3 OF ELEANOR DALE’S BOOK KNOXLANE

Once across Spruisty Bridge, we are in Bilton, the other side being Killinghall Parish. For many years the Bilton side was under the administration of Knaresborough Rural District Council before it was incorporated into Harrogate Borough Council. The children on the Bilton side usually attended Bilton Endowed School.

The first cottage on the left after leaving the Beck was a shop kept by a Mrs Duffield and later taken over by Mrs I. Smith. The shop closed sometime in the late 1950s. In the last cottage of the row is the remains of a pump which can still be seen. Next came a market garden run by Mr Pettinger. Between the terrace and the market garden is a gate leading to two fields, at the far side of which two houses were built at the side of the beck; they have long since been demolished My dad rented the two fields from Mr Pettinger and in the summer when the cows slept in the fields my friends and I would be delegated to take the herd to them from Bachelor Gardens after they had been milked in the afternoon, accompanied by the dog. We were instructed to let them graze on the way down on the wide grass verges which are still there today but not so lush or tidy. We were not allocated this task when the gipsies were camped there, which they did about twice a year.

The next row of cottages had a pump in a garden, this faced on to the pavement. I can remember when our second form teacher Miss Dickinson took us for nature walks down to the Beck, the boys would run forward to work the pump handle and flood the pavement before she could stop them.

Half way up Knox Lane a red iron bridge crossed over the road and carried the light railway into a tunnel on its way to New Park Gas Works; this, of course, was the Barber Line which enabled coal to be hauled from Bilton Junction to New Park. The tunnel came out near to the playground of New Park School. Sometimes, on its way back from the gasworks it would pull tankers containing tar oil. The line became extinct after the Second World War. The Barber engine is currently in a sorry state at Armley Mills Museum, Leeds awaiting restoration. Once the railway closed coal was hauled by road from Bilton Junction.

Beyond the bridge, the land bordering Knox Lane belonged to three farms. To the left, where the Kebbel Estate now is, the first two fields were cornfields and the next field, the biggest, was a pasture. On the right of the Lane, the first field belonged to Lambs Farm and was quite rocky. On the brow of the hill stood an old barn which I believe was home to many barn owls. This was demolished when the Knox and Ripley Estate was built. Next was a field that had been used as a market garden by the same market gardener who worked the Bachelor Gardens plot. My dad bought this field from Mr Carter and farmed it until after the Second World War. Before the War dad had sold the frontage to Mr F. Wilkinson who built the first houses on Knox Lane, later he purchased the rest of the field for development. The next field, where Knox Avenue is, belonged to Hill Top Farm. Bilton Cricket Club played cricket on the flat area of this field for many years. As children we would go and watch the game but if anyone misbehaved the grown up spectators would send us home in disgrace. We were not permitted to be noisy either. When Mr Thackray gave up farming and the farm changed hands the cricket club moved to land near the church before purchasing land on Bilton Lane where the fine ground and clubhouse are today. At the top of Knox Lane, at its junction with Bachelor Gardens and Crab are two stone cottages which are very old, but more of this next time.

KNOX HAMLET – by Eleanor Dale

Little is known about Knox Hamlet but I have seen a book (source unknown) that there used to be a bleach mill in the 1600s but after complaints about bleach in the water it was closed; I wonder if the site was where the com mill stood. The house at the old corn mill has a 1745 date inscribed over the fireplace so the mill itself is probably older. The grindstones were turned by a water wheel fed by a mill race, this flowed through fields on the west of Ripon Road then under Ripon Road near the entrance to Knox Mill Lane. Water for the mill race, which is now overgrown and dry, came from Oak Beck. The Oak Beck flowed past New Park Laundry and when the laundry was using the beck water it was difficult to get the water wheel at Knox to turn so the manager of the mill, Walter Stray, would get a friend of mine, Mrs Mary Robinson, and his daughter Eva to tread the wheel to start it. That meant walking up the wheel but never reaching the top. I do not know the history of the cottages at Knox but I do know that when the Beck used to flood it would go into the cottages flooding the downstairs rooms.

The big house at Knox is called Moorland Court and was owned and lived in by Mr Robson who was a Director of the Aire and Calder Water Board. I am not sure, but he may have owned some of the farm land of Spruisty Farm because he had a boathouse on the banks of the River Nidd. At the side of the Lodge to Moorland Court are some stone steps which are part of a public right of way over the fields to Killinghall Bridge. It was known as Mills Bottom and the stone steps are reputed to have been used by the monks of Fountains Abbey. This could be true as the road is an old one leading from the Fountains Abbey lands near Ripley and continuing through Bilton to the south where Fountains Abbey had granges. The packhorse bridge, Spruisty Bridge, over Oak Beck is said to have been used by James 6th of Scotland and 1st of England on his journey to London to take the English Crown. This too could be true because the wagons of his entourage would have been able to pass through the ford.

So far everything described has been in the Killinghall side of Oak Beck; in the next newsletter we will take a walk up Knox Lane on the Bilton side. Knox north of the town, is separated from Bilton by greenbelt. It straddles Oak Beck, which vehicles used to be able to cross via a ford. This route was blocked in the 1980s and the beck can now be crossed only by pedestrians and cyclists using the adjacent Spruisty packhorse bridge. Cars must go via the A61 (Ripon) road.

Hornbeam Park

Hornbeam Park is a small, recently developed area accessed only by Hookstone Road. It was developed as an office park and retains many offices, but now contains Harrogate College (a campus of Hull University), a Nuffield fitness and wellbeing centre, Travel Inn and restaurant, hospice and some small warehouses. It is served by Hornbeam Park railway station to Harrogate and Leeds.

Knaresborough History

Knaresborough has been around since the first century AD. Knaresborough Castle dates back as far as 1100 AD, in the midst of Norman rule. It was around this time that the town began to grow, with a thriving market that attracted shoppers and traders from far and wide. The town is packed full of history, from the 12th century hermit’s cave to the 19th century buildings by the riverside, once used in the local textiles trade. In fact, Knaresborough is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Cenheard’s fortress. Knaresborough Castle is Norman around 1100, the town began to grow and provide a market and attract traders to service the castle. The present parish church, St John’s, was established around this time. The earliest identified Lord of Knaresborough is around 1115 when Serlo de Burgh held the Honour of Knaresborough from the King.

A series of interesting characters began their stories in Knaresborough, and there are still traces of them now. Blind Jack still resides on a bench in the Market Square, a man who lost his vision but managed to become a pioneer road builder in the 1900s. The town’s public art trail also shows Guy Fawkes and King John, among others.Hugh de Morville was granted the Honour of Knaresborough in 1158. He was constable of Knaresborough and leader of the group of four knights who murdered Archbishop Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral on 29 December 1170. The four knights fled to Knaresborough and hid at the castle. Hugh de Morville forfeited the lands in 1173, not for his implication in the murder of Thomas Becket, but for “complicity in the rebellion of Henry the Young King, according to the Early Yorkshire Charters.

The Honour of Knaresborough then passed to the Stuteville family. When the Stuteville line was broken with the death of Robert the 4th (son of Robert 3rd) in 1205, King John effectively took the Honour of Knaresborough for himself. The first Maundy Money was distributed in Knaresborough by King John on 15 April 1210. Knaresborough Forest, which extended far to the south of the town, is reputed to have been one of King John’s favourite hunting grounds.

Although a market was first mentioned in 1206, the town was not granted a Royal Charter to hold a market until 1310, by Edward II. A market is still held every Wednesday in the market square. In Edward II’s reign, the castle was occupied by rebels and the curtain walls were breached by a siege engine. Later, Scots invaders burned much of the town and the parish church. In 1328, as part of the marriage settlement, Queen Philippa was granted “the Castle, Town, Forest and Honour of Knaresborough” by Edward III and the parish church was restored. After her death in 1369, the Honour was granted by Edward to their younger son, John of Gaunt, the Duke of Lancaster and since then the castle has belonged to the Duchy of Lancaster. After the accession of Henry IV, the castle lost much of its importance in national affairs but remained a key site in regional administration for another century The railway age began in Knaresborough in 1848 with the opening of a railway station on Hay Park Lane; this was replaced with the current one three years later in 1851. The town had a railway line to Boroughbridge until it closed to passengers in 1950; it was dismantled in 1964.

Old Mother Shipton’s Cave is one of the biggest draws of Knaresborough to visitors. In fact, the cave and petrifying well is known as England’s oldest tourist attraction, as it has been open to intrigued tourists, including Henry VIII, since the 17th century. Ripley Castle and Deer Park are just a short distance away, providing yet more for visitors to do in this charming old place. Boat hire is available too, you can meander at your leisure on the River Nidd, looking at the historic architecture of the town and the impressive viaduct.

Knaresborough Today:

The town has a large supermarket Lidl, which is located on the site of a former Co-Op store in Chain Lane, as well as smaller supermarkets in the town centre. The St. James retail park on the outskirts of the town, off Wetherby Road, has several retail chain units. The town has 15 public houses, a wine bar, two working men’s clubs and several restaurants. There are a number of national retailers with branches in the town centre, mostly around the High Street, Market Place and Castle Courtyard which is a shopping arcade in the former town hall. The town also has a small public swimming pool.

Knaresborough is mostly a commuter town however it serves as a local centre for the surrounding rural villages. The town has a small tourism industry and service sector. There is a small industrial estate on Manse Lane in the East of the town. Knaresborough has its own local weekly newspaper; the Knaresborough Post.

Knaresborough has five primary schools and one secondary school; King James’ School. There is a further education college in nearby Harrogate. The town has a two-storey library on the Market Place. The town has two Church of England churches, one Roman Catholic and one Methodist. It also has one United Reformed and one Mormon.

Knaresborough Town F.C. is based at Manse Lane; they play in the Northern Counties Eastern League Division 1. Youth football is catered for by Knaresborough Celtic with junior teams from Under 6s to Under 17s. Scotton Scorchers offer youth football for boys from the under 6s to under 12s and girls to under 17’s. Knaresborough Town are also developing youth football. Knaresborough Rugby Club play in the Yorkshire Leagues. The club was formed in 1982 and play at their Hay-a-park ground which opened in 2014. Unusually for a Yorkshire town, there is no rugby league club, the closest being in Wetherby.

The town has two cricket clubs. Knaresborough Forest Cricket Club were Nidderdale League Division 3 winners in 2005, afterwards promoted from Division 2 as runners-up in the following season. Knaresborough Cricket Club have a ground on Aspin Lane, where adult teams play in the Airedale & Wharfedale Senior Cricket League and junior teams play in the Nidderdale Junior Cricket League. Each June, there is a famous bed race at Knaresborough

The History of Pateley Bridge from the Middle Ages

In the early Middle Ages, the site of Pateley lay in lands of the Archbishop of York, which came to be known as Bishopside. During the 12th century the principal settlement in Bishopside was at Wilsill, rather than Pateley. Pateley was first recorded in 1175, as Patleiagate, with 14th century forms including Patheleybrig(ge). The final elements are clear, deriving from Old Norse gata (‘street’) and the northern dialect form brig (‘bridge’) respectively. There is more debate about the Pateley section of the name: the usual explanation is Old English pæþ (‘path’) in the genitive plural form paða + lah (‘open ground, clearing in a forest’); paða lah would mean “woodland clearing of the paths”, referring to paths up Nidderdale and from Ripon to Craven, which intersected here. However, the Pateley name forms competed in the Middle Ages with forms like Padlewath and Patheslayewathe which could be from Middle English *padil (‘a shallow place in water’) + Old Norse vath (‘ford’) and it could be that they owe something to this name. The local story that the name comes from ‘Pate’, an old Yorkshire dialect word for ‘Badger’ appears incorrect. In 1320 the Archbishop of York granted a charter for a market and fair at Pateley. From the 14th century until the early part of the 20th century, Scotgate Ash Quarry despatched hard wearing sandstone from its site on the northern flank above Pateley Bridge. When the railway arrived in Nidderdale, the stone was exported by trains and was used in railway platforms, national buildings and harbour walls. Ultimately Scotgate Ash Quarry was closed in 1915.Until 1964, Pateley Bridge railway station was the terminus of the railway line running up Nidderdale from Nidd Valley Junction, near Harrogate. Between 1907 and 1937, the Nidd Valley Light Railway ran farther up the dale. Access is now by road, with an hourly bus service from Harrogate. Pateley Bridge was once in the Lower Division of Claro Wapentake. In the 19th century local government reforms the town fell within the Pateley Bridge Poor Law Union, later the Pateley Bridge Rural Sanitary District and from 1894 Pateley Bridge Rural District. In 1937 the rural district was merged to become part of Ripon and Pateley Bridge Rural District. Since 1974 the town has fallen within the Borough of Harrogate in North Yorkshire. Pateley Bridge is the largest settlement in the civil parish of High and Low Bishopside, historically a township in the large parish of Ripon. High and Low Bishopside was created a civil parish in 1866. Pateley Bridge was granted town status in 1986, and the High and Low Bishopside Parish Council was renamed Pateley Bridge Town Council. However, the official name of the parish remains High and Low Bishopside.The parish is bounded on the west by the River Nidd and includes a large area of moorland to the east of the town. Other settlements in the parish include the southern part of Wath, Glasshouses, Wilsill, Blazefield and Fellbeck. The parish does not include the Nidderdale showground or the district of Bridgehouse Gate, which are on the west bank of the Nidd in the parish of Bewerley. The 2001 census showed that the parish had a population of just over 2000, increasing to 2,210 at the 2011 Census. Pateley Bridge 2011 Census showed: All Residents = 2718 – Number of Households = 1232 – Area in Hectares = 15305

The Nidderdale Way and Six Dales Trail both pass through the town. The town also serves as a sporting hub, with several teams (known collectively as ‘The Badgers’) competing in football, cricket and crown green bowling. Pateley is also served by Nidderdale Pool and Leisure Centre. Comprising a 20-metre swimming pool, fully equipped gym and sport hall and two squash courts, the facility officially opened in 2005 after many years of local fundraising. The town is also famous for the “Oldest Sweet Shop in England” which was established in 1827 and is validated as the longest continuous trading sweet shop in the world (Guinness World Records Book 2014) and is housed in one of the oldest buildings in Pateley Bridge. King Street workshops can be found on King Street & house a talented group of artists and designers. Their studios are open, and they include jewellers, milliner, textile art & gifts, sculptors, fine artist and glassblowers.

Pateley Bridge Today:

Pateley Bridge has a lot going for it, offering a large range of accommodation, starting with Cottages. Guest Houses, B & Bs with numerous places to eat with local cuisine and lots of homemade. There are several quaint local shops and tea rooms. And you must not miss England’s Oldest Sweet Shop to stock up on your favourite traditional sweets. Visit the Nidderdale Museum. Based in the Original Victorian workhouse, the museum houses a cobbler’s shop, school room and relics and artefacts, depicting the Yorkshire way of life. And in September do not miss the Nidderdale show.  An agricultural event held annually on the Pateley showground. The Pateley Bridge Show is one of the finest shows held in the North of England, every year boasts an array of marquees, events and stalls offering a variety of things to see and purchase.

Ripon History:

Ripon is a cathedral city in the Borough of Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, it is located at the confluence of two tributaries of the River Ure, the Laver and Skell. The city is noted for its main feature, Ripon Cathedral which is architecturally significant, as well as the Ripon Racecourse and other features such as its market. The city itself is just over 1,300 years old.

The city was originally known as Inhrypum and was founded by Saint Wilfrid during the time of the Anglian kingdom of Northumbria, a period during which it enjoyed prominence in terms of religious importance in Great Britain. It was for a period under Viking control and later suffered under the Normans. After a brief period of building projects under the Plantagenets, the city emerged with a prominent wool and cloth industry. Ripon became well known for its production of spurs during the 16th and 17th centuries but would later remain largely unaffected by the Industrial Revolution.

Ripon is the third smallest city in England by population. According to the 2011 United Kingdom Census, it had a population of 16,702. During its pre-history the area which later became Ripon was under the control of the Brigantes, a Brythonic tribe. Three miles north at Hutton Moor there is a large circular earthwork created by them. The Romans did not settle in Ripon, but they had a military outpost around five miles away at North Stainley. Solid evidence for the origins of Ripon can be traced back to the 7th century, the time of the Anglian kingdom of Northumbria. The first structure built in the area, known at the time as Inhrypum, was a Christian church dedicated to St. Peter, with the settlement originating in the year 658.

The earliest settlers were stonemasons, glaziers and plasterers that Wilfrid brought over to help construct the Ripon monastery, from Lyon in Francia and Rome which was then under Byzantine rule. The years following the death of Wilfrid are obscure in Ripon’s history. After the invasion of the Great Heathen Army of Norse Vikings in Northumbria, the Danelaw was established and the Kingdom of Jórvík was founded in the Yorkshire area. In 937 Athelstan, then King of England, granted the privilege of sanctuary to Ripon, for a mile around the church. One of his successors was less well-disposed: after the Northumbrians rebelled against English rule in 948, King Edred had the buildings at Ripon burned. Prosperity was restored by the end of the 10th century, as the body of Saint Cuthbert was moved to Ripon for a while, due to the threat of Danish raids.

After the Norman conquest, much of the north rebelled in 1069, even trying to bring back Danish rule. The suppression that followed was the Harrying of the North, which resulted in the death of approximately one-third of the population of the North of England. Ripon is thought to have shrunk to a small community around the church following the suppression. The lands of the church were transferred to St. Peter’s Church at York as the Liberty of Ripon and it was during this time that a grand Collegiate Church was built on top of the ruins of Wilfrid’s building. During the 12th century Ripon built up a booming wool trade, attracting Italian trade merchants, especially Florentines, who bought and exported large quantities.

Ripon’s proximity to Fountains Abbey, where the Cistercians had a long tradition of sheep farming and owned much grazing land, was a considerable advantage. After English people were forbidden from wearing foreign cloth in 1326, Ripon developed a cloth industry which was third in size in Yorkshire after York and Halifax. Due to conflict with Scotland, the political emphasis was on the North during the time of Edward I and Edward II, as Scottish invaders attacked numerous northern English towns.

Ripon, which relied heavily on its religious institutions, was badly affected by the English Reformation under the Tudor king Henry VIII. The Abbot of Fountains, William Thirske, was expelled by Henry and replaced; Thirske went on to become one of the leaders of the Pilgrimage of Grace popular rising. The people of Northern England were quite traditional in their beliefs and were unhappy about Henry’s intention to break with Rome. After Mary, Queen of Scots, fled Scotland to Northern England she stayed at Ripon on her journey. The mainly Catholic North supported her, and there was another popular rising known as the Rising of the North; this began six miles away at Topcliffe and was led by Thomas Percy, the 7th Earl of Northumberland and Charles Neville, the 6th Earl of Westmorland. The rebels stayed at Ripon on 18 November 1569, but the rising eventually failed resulting in 600 people being executed, 300 of whom were hanged at Gallows Hill in Ripon during January 1570.

Ripon replaced its old textiles industry with one for the manufacture of spurs during the 16th century. They were so widely known that they gave rise to the proverb “as true steel as Ripon Rowels. At the time, spurs did not just serve as functional riding accessories, they were also fashionable; an expensive pair was made for King James I when he stayed at Ripon in 1617. It was James who granted Ripon a Royal Charter in 1604 and created the first Mayor of Ripon. After the Bishops’ Wars in Scotland, a treaty was signed at Ripon in 1640 to stop the conflict between Charles I and the Scottish Covenanters. Although Ripon was not in the main line of fighting which was to the east, it remained loyal and royalist during the English Civil War. There was an incident in 1643, when parliamentarian forces under Thomas Mauleverer entered Ripon and damaged the Minster, but John Mallory and the royalist forces soon settled the matter after a skirmish in the Market Place. The royalists were eventually defeated in the Civil War and Charles I spent two nights as a prisoner in Ripon. Oliver Cromwell visited the city twice on his way to battle, once on the way to the Preston and on the way to the Battle of Worcester. Communications were improved with the opening of Ripon railway station in May 1848. During the First World War, a large military training camp was built in Ripon, the local community offering hospitality not only to soldiers’ wives but to the Flemish refugees who became part of Ripon’s community. The racecourse south-east of the city also served as an airfield for the Royal Flying Corps The racecourse was also used as a demobilisation centre for troops returning from France well into 1919.

Ripon was the first Church of England diocese to be created after the English Reformation, as it was recognised that existing dioceses were unsuited for the large increases in population caused particularly by the Industrial Revolution of the 18th century in central England. It was deemed that new cathedral building on a national scale was not viable and so Ripon, containing a high-status parish church, was created from the existing Chester and York dioceses in 1836, with the building promoted to cathedral status. Ripon council presumed this had elevated the town to the rank of city and started referring to itself as such In 1974 R

Harrogate Convention Centre Events

Harrogate Convention Centre

UNIQUELY FLEXIBLE, WORLD-LEADING FACILITIES FOR EVENTS, CONFERENCES, EXHIBITIONS AND MUST-SEE ENTERTAINMENT.

Use of this Site constitutes acceptance of our Terms and Conditions

Harrogate Convention Centre has been designed with you in mind. We’ve evolved over almost 200 years, combining stunning heritage with contemporary, adaptable spaces that transform to suit your needs.

Always check and confirm details as they can change – Phone: 01423 500500

WC 20 September EVENT TIMINGS TYPE OF EVENT ENTRANCES
Monday Flooring Exhibition 0930 – 1730 Trade Exhibition 3,4 &5
Tuesday Flooring Exhibition 0930 – 1500 Trade Exhibition 3, 4 &5
Tuesday – Thursday Conference 0830- 1700 Trade Event 3
Thursday Jimmy Carr 2000 Entertainment Royal Hall
Friday Billy Ocean 1930 Entertainment Entrance 1
Saturday Michael Bolton 1930 Entertainment Entrance 1
Sunday Royal Hall Open Day 1000-1600 Public Open Day Royal Hall
WC 27 September EVENT TIMINGS TYPE OF EVENT ENTRANCES
Wednesday Fascinating Aida 1930 Entertainment Royal Hall
Thursday-Saturday Tip-ex 1000-1800 Trade Exhibition 4 & 5
WC 4 October EVENT TIMINGS TYPE OF EVENT ENTRANCES
Monday Clinton Baptiste 1930 Entertainment Royal Hall
Tuesday Tim Vine 1930 Entertainment Royal Hall
Wednesday Royal Hall Open Day 1000-1600 Public Open Day Royal Hall
Thursday – Saturday Conference Conference Ent
Friday Jason Byrne 2000 Entertainment Royal Hall
WC 11 October EVENT TIMINGS TYPE OF EVENT ENTRANCE
Tuesday School Event School Royal Hall
Wednesday Not Lady Chatterley’s Lover 1930 Entertainment Royal Hall
Thursday Ian Sterling 2000 Entertainment Royal Hall
Thursday Katherine Ryan 2000 Entertainment Ent 1
Thursday Harrogate Climate Action Festival Public Event Ent 3
Friday Jimeoin 1930 Entertainment Royal Hall
Friday Cause UK with NAOB 1500 Entertainment Royal Hall
Friday-Sunday UK Handmade Bicycle Show Friday 1300-1900, Saturday 0930 -1800 Sunday 1000-1600 Public Exhibition Ent 4
Sunday Martin Hughes Wildlife Roadtrip 1900 Entertainment Royal Hall
Sunday Harrogate International Nursery Fair 0930 – 1730 Trade Exhibition Ent 3
WC 18 October EVENT TIMINGS TYPE OF EVENT ENTRANCE
Monday Harrogate International Nursery Fair 0930 – 1730 Trade Exhibition
Tuesday Harrogate International Nursery Fair 0930 -1600 Trade Exhibition
Tuesday Russian State Ballet – Nutcracker Entertainment Royal Hall
Wednesday Russian State Ballet – Swan Lake Entertainment Royal Hall
Thursday Russian State Ballet – Sleeping Beauty Entertainment Royal Hall

 

Last Thursday, Harrogate Golf Club was the venue of the latest round in the series of Yorkshire Order of Merit tournaments

Last Thursday, Harrogate Golf Club was the venue of the latest round in the series of Yorkshire Order of Merit tournaments. Forty of the best amateur golfers from across the north came to play 36 holes competing to win the “Vardon Grip” trophy. On a good day and on a course universally praised by the players we were treated to a fine competition. What Harrogate members know is that the course is a good test and rewards accurate golf and that was evident when the 1st round scores came in and there was only one “in red numbers”.  That player was Nathan Bradby of Wheatley G.C. with a one under par 68. So, with Bradby leading at the half-way stage it was Joshua Morley (Hallowes G.C.) with a one over 70 lying second from Michael Henson of Rockcliffe Hall and Tom Birstwhistle from Knaresborough G.C. both on 71. Knowing what to expect, the players came out to play the second round with extra resolve. Two players in particular, Andrew McCarrick from South Shields G.C. and Will Marshall of Heworth G.C. put together flawless rounds to record par 69’s to move right up the leader-board. Michael Henson retained his consistency to card 72 in the afternoon. Tom Osborne from Lindrick G.C. made a strong move but had to settle for 4th with Morley unfortunately slipping down to 5th.  Scott Minto (Hanging Heaton G.C.) had a mixed day but was delighted to get a superb “hole in one” at the 12th during the second round.

Results: 1st and winner of the “Vardon Grip” trophy, A. McCarrick (2), 73+69=142. 2nd W. Marshall

(-4) 74+72=143. 3rd M. Henson (-2) 71-72=143.

19 Ladies played a medal and the Anniversary Salver. Louise Sellars and Lady Vice Captain Boo Orman both came in with an under par 71.

Div. 1. 1st, Lady Vice Captain, Boo Orman, nett 71. 2nd,Wendy Skaife, nett 77. 3rd, Celia Fowler, nett 78. Div. 2. 1st, Viv Allison, nett 73. 2nd, Elizabeth Goody, nett 78. 3rd, Anne Jones, nett 78. Div. 3.

1st, Louise Sellars, nett71. 2nd, Lady Captain, Lynne Shears, nett 86.

The Anniversary Salver was won by Boo Orman on a back 9 count back from Loiuse Sellars

Results of the Ladies 9-hole stableford: 1st, Liz Milburn, 14 points. 2nd, Helga Perkins, 13pts. 3rd, Ann Winship, 12pts.

The mid-week Stableford contested by 45 players proved to be a “breeze” for Steve Wright (10) winning with an impressive 37 points from Luke Donnelly (5) on 35 points. Three players, Peter Raybaud (11), Kevin Anderson (17) & Robin Jackson (23), tied for 3rd

The run of dry weather finally ended for Saturdays competition but the pulses of heavy downpours did not deter the players and a very large field played in the pairs “Texas Scramble”. We have become to expect winning scores well below par in this format and Saturday was no different. The top seven pairs were separated by just 3 shots but there was a clear winner, with Steve Wright capping a good week by winning with Jonathan Kingston recording a 9 under, nett 60. Richard Danby & David Keywood along with Kristian Bendtsen & Joe Isle were tied in 2nd place on nett 61.

The 36 hole, R.D.J. Salver is one of the Stellar competitions in the Juniors playing season. Completing 36 holes is a challenge in it’s own right for our Juniors but this season that did just that and combined it with super scores. Josh Chi, came out as the winner closely followed by Harvey Auckland and Dexter Ward. Well played everyone!

Supporting Older People in Harrogate and districts

Supporting Older People in Harrogate – Visit the website here – Location: Community House, 46 50 East Parade, Harrogate, HG1 5RR – Phone: 01423 531490.

At Supporting Older People we:

  • Assess and match older people with volunteer visitors
  • Organise social activities, outings and events
  • Liaise with our family, statutory agencies and voluntary organisations
  • Host events where volunteers and the people we support join together, these include our Christmas party, quizzes and International Day of Older Persons’ Lunch

Supporting Older People in & around Harrogate. We are very proud to be Harrogate Bowling Club’s chosen charity. They are holding a charity afternoon this Saturday, 28th August, and have invited members of Supporting Older People along. Please could we ask you to share this with your contacts if you think they would be interested in attending. The afternoon starts at 1.00 with some bowls. An afternoon tea will be served at 3.30 during which the raffle will be drawn, and then finally an auction will start by 4.30. We would need to let them know numbers by Thursday so please let us know. – Community House, 46 – 50 East Parade, Harrogate, HG1 5RR – Phone: 01423 531490

 

Visiting Harrogate Blog

Harrogate You SHALL go to the ball

Ladies and Gentlemen, Boys and girls, Harrogate Theatre’s magical family Pantomime is back!

Please take your seats for Cinderella! It isn’t officially Christmas until you’ve been to see the Pantomime! Harrogate Theatre is delighted to confirm that Cinderella WILL be going to the ball this year and all of Harrogate is invited! Dust off your ball gowns and get ready to boo, hiss, cheer and sing all before the clock strikes twelve. Remember that feeling, you’ve taken your seats, the lights are dimmed, a hush spreads over the auditorium and then…the music kicks in, it’s upbeat and fun, it warms the soul and you KNOW this is going to be a brilliant show! Poor Cinderella doesn’t get out much and with her two horrible sisters making her do all the housework, there’s no chance she’ll be going to the big party at the palace. So, when her magical fairy godmother rocks up with a top-notch frock, the most fabulous pair of shoes, and a hot ticket to THE glitzy event of the year, all her wishes come true for just one night!

Join us on a magical adventure as Cinderella dances the night away and races against the clock, all with the help of a little fairy magic and her best friends by her side! Packed with sparkle and festive fun, Harrogate Theatre’s magical family pantomime is back with a bang, and we just can’t wait to see you there! “All at Harrogate Theatre are so excited to be putting the final touches to this year’s pantomime. Tickets are selling fast as the reality that Cinderella is to finally go ahead sinks in. Make sure you don’t miss out this Christmas… it promises to be a ball!” David Bown- Chief Exec “Absolutely delighted we will be back in the rehearsal room this Christmas. I’ve missed the boos and cheers so can’t wait to start creating a spectacular panto for the beautiful people of Harrogate”. Phil Lowe- Director

Panto Runs WED 24 NOV 2021- SUN 16 JAN 2022 Written by David Bown and Phil Lowe, Directed by Phil Lowe. With audio described, relaxed, s

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You get an email which appears to be from a friend or colleague asking you to buy a number of gift cards – Google or Apple Pay. The email will usually be from someone you know (their email may have been hacked) and explains they can’t buy the gift cards themselves because they are in a meeting or can’t get to the shop but that they will pay you back as soon as they can.This email will also likely ask you to photograph the cards once purchased and send them photos of the unique codes printed on each card.  This allows the scammer to use the gift cards to make online purchases and needless to say you will never see your money again. Typically the value of the gift cards is in the £100s.

If you do get an email like this, do not purchase any gift cards. If it is from someone you know, ring them to check if the request is really from them and if not then they need to be alerted their email may have been hacked.

If you work in retail and someone attempts to buy gift cards to a large value, please check they are aware of this scam and that they are certain the request they have received to buy the cards is genuine.

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Pet Cat is reunited with family after FOUR years thanks to the RSPCA and a microchip

The RSPCA has reunited a family with their cat who went missing four years ago after she was found struggling to breathe just half a mile from where they used to live.

RSPCA Inspector Elizabeth Boyd was contacted on 3 August to rescue a cat that had been found near a nursing home in Whixley, Harrogate. The residents had been feeding the cat for a little while but that day they saw that she appeared to be struggling to breathe and needed urgent help.

Beth said: “I went and collected the cat and scanned her for a chip. She was chipped but unfortunately, the number had been disconnected so I took the cat to the vets and then drove to the address on the microchip in Skelton on Ure. I then discovered that the owners of the cat had sadly moved from that address so I made enquiries which led me to the post office. They were able to send a letter to the new address to let them know we had Nora and within a week, we had found her owner after four long years!

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This is the August edition of Harrogate Residents’ News

 

  • Our new health and wellbeing company Brimhams Active
  • Christmas coming to Harrogate
  • Waste and recycling changes next week
  • Harrogate Street Aid
  • Sharing your views about keeping communities safe
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Coronavirus: Latest guidance

As we mentioned in the last edition of Residents’ News, England has now moved to Step 4 of the government’s roadmap.

While cases are high and rising, everybody needs to continue to act carefully and remain cautious. This is why government are keeping in place key measures:

  • Testing when you have symptoms
  • Isolate when positive or when contacted by NHS Test and Trace
  • Wear face coverings in crowded areas such as public transport
  • Minimise the number, proximity and duration of social contacts

16 and 17 year olds in England have also now been offered a first dose of a Covid-19 vaccine to give them the vital protection provided by the vaccine before returning to school in September.

If you have not yet booked your first or second Covid-19 vaccine, you should do so as soon as possible.

In the meantime, please continue to follow guidance and stay safe.

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Council launches new community health and wellbeing company

This month, we launched our new community health and wellbeing company Brimhams Active.

One of the key objectives of Brimhams Active is to enable people to move more, live well and feel great. And by transforming a conventional leisure service into a leading community focussed health and wellbeing service, we’ll be able to make sure being active is attractive, welcoming and inclusive.

This is supported by our plans to provide the most up-to-date facilities across the Harrogate district for future generations. This investment project will also have a key focus on carbon management and energy efficiencies to contribute to our ambitious carbon reduction goals.

This work has already started in Ripon, and you can find out more in the next edition of Residents’ News.

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Christmas is coming to Harrogate

We are pleased to announce that Market Place Europe has submitted an expression of interest to host a Christmas market in Harrogate town centre from 3 to 12 December.

Market Place Europe have vast experience of operating successful markets across the UK and will bring traders from countries such as Germany, France, Belgium, Spain and Italy, as well as a number of local traders.

We will now work with the organisers, and our local partners, to ensure the event is delivered safely and encourages visitors to the town this festive season.

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Waste and recycling collection changes next week

The Summer Bank Holiday means there are changes to garden waste, refuse and recycling collections next week.

All collections will take place a day later than your usual date so please bear this in mind when putting your waste out.

You can check your collection day on the In My Area section of our website.

Normal collections will resume on Monday 6 September.

Garden waste subscription service update

New garden waste subscriptions will close on Tuesday 31 August for collections which run until mid-November.

If you subscribed this year, we’ll be in touch in January with details about subscribing for the 2022 season.

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Tickets selling fast for outdoor theatre performances in our parks

We’re excited to welcome Chapterhouse Theatre Company to perform A Midsummer Night’s Dream and Alice in Wonderland in our parks this September.

Star-crossed Athenian lovers, playful fairies and hilarious traveling players make for an unforgettable performance of magical theatre. Enjoy a wonderful evening of Shakespeare’s best-loved romantic comedy, complete with beautiful Elizabethan costumes and a splendid musical score.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream will take place in Valley Gardens, Harrogate on Friday 3 September and at Knaresborough Castle on Saturday 4 September.

You can also enjoy the magical world of Alice in wonderland and meet a whole host of colourful characters. From the unforgettable White Rabbit and the madcap Mad Hatter to the terrifying Queen of Hearts. Alice’s journey couldn’t be filled with more mystery and adventure in a show alive with song, dance and original music.

Buy your tickets now for this afternoon performance on Sunday 5 September in Ripon Spa Gardens.

Hurry, as tickets are selling fast!

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Harrogate Street Aid launches second tap terminal

Harrogate Street Aid has launched its second contactless tap terminal at Victoria Shopping Centre in Harrogate.

Each tap with a bank card donates £3 to the project, which supports homeless people across the Harrogate district by providing financial help to support them turn a corner in their lives.

Grants are awarded to help individuals get off and stay off the streets. They are designed to offer long-term, practical help that will bring about real change for that person.

Grants vary from person to person, but examples include education or training courses, clothing for job interviews or health and wellbeing support.

You can find out more by visiting the Harrogate Street Aid website.

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THE LOCAL LOTTO celebrates its third birthday

This September, THE LOCAL LOTTO celebrates its third birthday.

THE LOCAL LOTTO was launched as a way to raise additional funds for our voluntary and community groups across the Harrogate district. To date, the lotto has raised over £150,000 for local good causes.

With minimal administration and with no joining fee it is a great way for good causes to fund raise. The money raised makes an important contribution towards keeping our voluntary and community sector thriving. It also enables players to support the local good causes they care about most.

60p from every £1 ticket sold goes direct to local charities, voluntary organisations and community groups. Players also have the chance of winning a £25,000 jackpot plus smaller cash prizes each week.

Visit THE LOCAL LOTTO website to sign-up and start fundraising.

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North Yorkshire Police, Fire and Crime Commissioner Philip Allott is asking you to share your views on how to keep communities safe.

It’s part of a three-month consultation on the priorities for policing, fire and rescue and victims’ services across North Yorkshire and York.

New commissioners are required by law to set out their plans for the length of their term and Philip wants to hear from as many people before Sunday 7 November as he develops his police and crime plan, and fire and rescue plan for 2021-2024.

You can share your views on the Tell Philip website.

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Come and join team Harrogate

We think Harrogate Borough Council is a fantastic place to work (but then we’re slightly biased).

As well as amazing colleagues, we offer competitive salaries, flexi-time and a range of other benefits.

We’re always looking for new people to join the team. We currently have the following vacancies:

We’re also looking for a number of lifeguards. If you’ve got the experience or fancy trying something new we’d love to hear from you.

Visit our jobs page to find out more about working for us and all the latest opportunities.

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Pet Cat is reunited with family after FOUR years thanks to the RSPCA and a microchip

The RSPCA has reunited a family with their cat who went missing four years ago after she was found struggling to breathe just half a mile from where they used to live.

RSPCA Inspector Elizabeth Boyd was contacted on 3 August to rescue a cat that had been found near a nursing home in Whixley, Harrogate. The residents had been feeding the cat for a little while but that day they saw that she appeared to be struggling to breathe and needed urgent help.

Beth said: “I went and collected the cat and scanned her for a chip. She was chipped but unfortunately, the number had been disconnected so I took the cat to the vets and then drove to the address on the microchip in Skelton on Ure. I then discovered that the owners of the cat had sadly moved from that address so I made enquiries which led me to the post office. They were able to send a letter to the new address to let them know we had Nora and within a week, we had found her owner after four long years!

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Latest update on incident at Bilsdale mast

An update on our efforts to restore services following the incident at the Bilsdale mastLater today (17/08), we expect to return digital radio services from SDL and D1 from Eston Nab, providing digital radio on those multiplexes for much of Middlesbrough, Stockton-on-Tees and the coast to Hartlepool. We continue to be in constant dialogue with all our broadcaster customers, Freeview and our regulator Ofcom regarding our plans, and updating MPs to keep them informe

As per our previous update, we now expect to have completed the improvement of TV coverage from Eston Nab, and also the installation of a further 15m mast at a site in Arncliffe Wood by the weekend. These two developments should deliver a significant improvement in TV coverage for viewers in the areas including Darlington, Stockton, Catterick, Leyburn, Masham and Ripon. We will update viewers on any action they need to take with further updates later this week. Work on phase 2 of the recovery plan continues. We still anticipate the temporary mast to be effective by 28 August.For further help and advice please contact Freeview at https://www.freeview.co.uk/bilsdale-transmitter

Bilsdale Mast update

Over the weekend work has continued at both our Eston Nab site and Bilsdale itself in efforts to recover services for more people. The Fire Service were able to access the base of the mast for the first time since the fire broke out and we are now able to begin the process of assessing the condition of the mast itself. There are no findings to report at this stage and we will update as soon as we are able. As reported last week, some television multiplexes (a multiplex is a bundle of digital channels) are now broadcasting from Eston Nab.

We are currently undertaking additional works at the Eston Nab site to allow us to extend the coverage area of the signal to cover parts of Darlington, Richmond and Barnard Castle among others which we expect to be complete this week.

We are grateful to our landowners who continue to provide access to their lands to allow this critical work to take place.

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Organised crime gang and Harrogate landlady jailed after sophisticated cannabis grows found at three properties

A Harrogate property landlady and six members of an organised crime gang from London have been jailed for a total of 28 years and 11 months after cannabis farms were found in three Harrogate rental properties.

The sentences follow a complex investigation after police in Harrogate were called to a disturbance in Alexandra Road on 26 September when vehicles left a trail of cannabis debris in the street.

Two of the vehicles involved, including one loaded with cannabis, were tracked heading south and was intercepted by Hertfordshire Police. A search of the vehicle resulted in officers seizing around £300,000 worth of cannabis.

At the same time, police officers in Harrogate searched a house in Alexandra Road that turned out to be owned by Yoko Banks, a 73-year-old Harrogate property landlady. Inside they found an established cannabis grow along with equipment including an electrical wiring and security system.

A search of further properties owned by Banks revealed two more cannabis farms in Woodlands Road and Somerset Road . In total police seized cannabis with a street value of up to £240,000 from the three properties.

The houses had been rented out to a third party who then sub-let them to the organised crime gang, with Banks expecting to make thousands of pounds from the arrangement.

Albanian nationals Visar Sellaj, 33, of Newnham Road, London and the ring-leader of the gang, was jailed for six years and nine months; Kujtim Brahaj, 50, of Wellington Road, Enfield, was jailed for three years and two months, Indrit Brahaj, 27, of Whitings Road, Barnet was jailed for four years and four months; Bledar Elezaj, 36, of no fixed address was jailed for three years, Erblin Elezaj, aged in his 30s, also of no fixed address was jailed for five years and two months. All five were sentenced at Leeds Crown Court on Friday 13 August. Andi Kokaj, 23, of no fixed address, was jailed for three years on Monday 16 August.

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Police called to Pateley Bridge on Saturday after a group of men were fighting on the High Street. The incident happened early evening on Saturday 14 August 2021. Members of the public of the public saw a group of men fighting in the street. One man suffered head injuries that needed treatment.

A 22-year-old man was arrested in connection with the incident. He has since been released under investigation while enquiries continue. Members of the public used smartphones to take images of what happened. Police are keen to see images of the incident and are particularly interested in finding out how the incident started and what happened initially.If you have any information about this incident or have any images please call 101, choose option 2 and dial 30820.

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14.8.21 Rob Hunters post match thoughts following our win over Hemsworth BY KNARESBOROUGH TOWN AFC – CLICK HERE TO WATCH THE VIDEO

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New report shows air quality has improved across the Harrogate district

While monitoring results have been improving for a number of years, this is the first year that all four air quality management areas in Bond End and York Place Knaresborough, Skellgate Ripon and Woodlands Junction in Harrogate have reduced to below the nitrogen dioxide national air quality objectives set by the government.

This year the borough council have:

  • carried out a trial of low cost sensors in AQMA’s
  • introduced a car club in Harrogate town centre
  • worked on the implementation of the Ultra-Low Emissions (ULEV) Strategy, with phase one funding secured

The report, which has been sent to the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) for approval, will be published on the council’s website in due course.

Councillor Phil Ireland, the cabinet member for carbon reduction and sustainability, said: “It’s positive that annual reading for nitrogen dioxide is below the national air quality objectives.

“We’re keen to remain at this level, or better still continue to improve, and have a number of actions as part of our air quality action plan.

“These include working with HGV, bus, and taxi providers to improve the quality of their fleet, our ultra-low emission vehicle strategy as well as air quality campaigns and education. We will also continue to trial our low cost automatic sensors.

“We are optimistic that the improvements in air quality will continue post Covid, as many people have embraced a hybrid model of working at home and in the office.

“We will also continue working with our transport planners, fleet manager, and our colleagues in North Yorkshire County Council’s public health and highways teams to monitoring air quality and tailor our action plan accordingly.”

Local authorities have a statutory duty under the Environment Act 1995, Part IV to produce an annual air quality status report

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Harrogate Theatre Safety Update

As capacity restrictions are lifted, and more events are starting to take place, Harrogate Theatre wants to ensure our audience members feel secure and comfortable attending performances.

We currently work alongside The Society of London Theatre (SOLT) & UK Theatre’s “See it Safely” campaign guidelines and offer sanitiser, temperature checks and the opportunity, if you wish, to check into the venue with an NHS QR code.

We also request using e-tickets wherever possible to reduce physical contact.

Moving forward, Harrogate Theatre is updating its Terms and Conditions, not only to protect customers but also our staff. We are therefore requesting the following for all performances:

• We ask that all audience members bring with them proof of double-vaccination OR a recent negative lateral flow test OR natural immunity via an Antibodies Test.

• Proof of full vaccination should you have received both doses at least 14 days prior to your performance time. You can present this certification via the NHS COVID Pass within the NHS App, or internationally recognised equivalent. If you do not have a smart phone, please click here for details of how to request an NHS COVID Pass letter. Your vaccination card will also be sufficient.

• Present proof of a negative Lateral Flow Test via the NHS COVID App or a text message or email from the NHS Test and Trace. This test must be taken within 48 hours of your performance time.

• Should you have natural immunity based on a positive PCR test taken within 180 days of the performance, please present this proof via the NHS COVID Pass within the NHS App.

Please note that this only applies to audience members aged 18 and over. Attendees under the age of 18 will be asked for verbal confirmation (by them or by a parent or guardian on their behalf) that they have not received a positive test for COVID-19 and are not displaying symptoms of COVID-19.

We also request that face coverings are worn, unless exempt, whilst entering our venues, whilst moving around the venues, toilets and bars, but whilst seated face coverings may be removed.

Harrogate Theatre will continue to monitor the situation and updated information can be found on our website click here.

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Work starts on new single Council

Work is beginning towards the creation of a new single council to provide all local services for everyone in North Yorkshire.

The Government has given the go-ahead for the existing eight councils – the county, district and borough councils – to be replaced from spring 2023 by one council, bringing together all services, from planning, roads and housing to health, leisure, culture and more, enriching lives and offering opportunities.

So what will this mean for you?

The single council will be easier for everyone – residents and businesses – with all local services joined up and delivered by one dedicated team, bringing together the best of county and districts.

People will be able to find any information they need from a single website.

They will be able to call a single number with any issues.

And they will have a single councillor to whom they can take their concerns.

All of this will be available where they live, as the single council will put local decision-making and local delivery of services at the heart of the county with:

  • a main office in each former district area, offering face-to-face expertise and advice on a broad range of public services as well as meeting space to support local decision-making and democracy.
  • a supporting network of 30 additional customer access sites, which will offer people the opportunity to get advice and support in, or as close as possible to, where they live or work.
  • 25 community networks based around market town areas with the voluntary sector, community members and partners like the police, fire and NHS coming together to drive local change, enterprise and solutions.
  • greater powers and funding passing to parish and town councils, for those that would welcome it.
  • six powerful area constituency committees providing greater transparency, holding the new North Yorkshire council to account, and using delegated powers to make decisions in areas including local planning, licensing, public rights of way, highways and potentially others.

County council leader Cllr Carl Les has shared his views on the wide-ranging ways in which everyone can benefit. He says:

“In North Yorkshire, we are famous for our straight talking so I want to be clear on what an opportunity we have before us.

“Government has given the green light for a new single council, which will deliver all local services to every household in the county from spring 2023. Not in itself perhaps the most exciting line on earth – but the benefits this approach will bring are real and must not be underestimated.

“Put simply, that’s eight councils, with a wealth of dedicated and skilled staff between them, coming together to form one focused workforce, joining up all those services that will make life easier for everyone.

“Aligning things like planning, broadband, highways and housing to build stronger communities. Joining up job opportunities with education and skills. Support for families with health, leisure and cultural offers.

“The chance to enrich and improve the lives of very many people here and offer residents everywhere a fairer future.

“It will also save tens of millions that can be ploughed back into strengthening public services and empowering communities to drive and deliver on what matter most to them.

“So we are rolling up our sleeves because alongside all the essential business as usual priorities, we will be continuing our good work with town and parish councils and community groups.

“We will be pursuing the benefits of devolution to ensure that our great county can play its full role as a rural powerhouse, punching its weight nationally and regionally and flying the flag for our county, a place we are all proud to call our home.

“So, whatever your view on the timing of, detail or context for big changes to how services are future-proofed here, please come together as one to help deliver the very best for every single person in the county. Team North Yorkshire is resilient, caring and focused. Let’s show the nation what we can do. Thank you.”

Find out more about the single council.

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Olympic double gold medallist Adam Peaty to make splash with young swimmers at Ashville

Swimming superstar and soon-to-be Strictly Come Dancing 2021 contestant, Adam Peaty MBE, will be swapping the Olympic pool in Tokyo for one in Harrogate where he will be inspiring the next generation of world-beating athletes.

Adam Peaty, who claimed Team GB’s first gold medal in this summer’s Tokyo Olympics and went on to win another gold and a silver, making him the most successful British swimmer in more than a century, is bringing his Race Clinic to Ashville College on Monday, August 23.

The sell-out event, which is being staged in the College’s Sports Centre, is one of ten taking place across the UK, and the only one in Yorkshire.

Being held for swimmers aged eight to 17, Adam and his team have created the ultimate inspirational day, bringing together support for both athletes and parents to have the best experience possible on their swimming journey.

Adam Peaty won the gold medal in the 100m breaststroke at the 2016 Summer Olympics and made history last month by becoming the first British swimmer ever to retain an Olympic title. He is also an eight-time World Champion, a 16-time European Champion, and a three-time Commonwealth Champion.

Adam Peaty’s appearance at Ashville College comes just weeks after one of the biggest names in world ballet, Wayne Sleep, also visited the independent school which was hosting the Yorkshire Ballet Seminars.

The Adam Peaty Race Clinic features three ‘swim stations’:

  • Station 1: ‘Breaststroke technique station & Pull Out’ station led by Adam Peaty and Edward Baxter, a British swimming champion and record holder.

 

  • Station 2: A ‘Land’ session led by Robert Norman, who is Adam Peaty’s gym coach. There will be a heavy focus on injury prevention.

 

  • Station 3: The ‘Racing Edge’ Station led by Tim Shuttleworth, who competed in the men’s 1500m freestyle event at the 2016 Rio Olympics. He will give insights on how to gain the mental edge necessary to compete successfully.

After the practical training sessions of each swim clinic, Adam enjoys sharing his lessons, wins, losses, and biggest learning experiences with the course participants. The day normally finishes with a Q&A session.

The aim of the Race Clinics is to “make it something that people had never seen before and do something that is often missed out in the swimming world… teaching young swimmers how to race”.

Duncan Archer, Head of Swimming, Athletics and Sports Development at Ashville, said: “Adam is a national hero, one of our greatest ever Olympians, and an inspiration for young swimmers keen to emulate his success in the pool.

“A few short weeks ago, he was in the Olympic pool, in Tokyo, and soon he’ll be in our pool!”

Anna Rakusen-Guy, Ashville’s Events and Lettings Manager, said: “We are absolutely delighted that Adam and his team have chosen Ashville for one of their ten race clinics, and the only one in Yorkshire.

“Our sports facility, which includes a heated 30m swimming pool, are used by a variety of different sports clubs and individuals throughout the year.

“Over the years, they have been home to a number of different sport camps, including the Andrew Flintoff Cricket Academy, the Louis Smith Gymnastics Academy, plus others coaching rugby, netball and hockey.”

For more information about Ashville College, please visit www.ashville.co.uk or call 01423 566358.

Founded in 1877, Ashville College is a leading independent day and boarding school for boys and girls aged two to 18 years. It is located in the North Yorkshire spa town of Harrogate, and consists of Ashville Acorns Pre-Prep and Ashville’s Prep School, Senior School and Sixth Form. Ashville College is a member of the HMCBSAISC, and NEASC, and an associate member of the Methodist Independent Schools Trust.

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Harrogate street to trial Cycling active travel measures

A pioneering trial to enhance Harrogate’s vision for sustainable transport is to be introduced on Victoria Road.

As part of the upcoming Otley Road cycle route, North Yorkshire County Council highways team is to implement an 18-month trial for a one-way filter lane on Victoria Road.

The proposal recognises sustainable travel links to the town centre from the West of Harrogate, along with the schemes on Victoria Avenue and Harrogate town centre, to be delivered through the Active Travel Fund and Transforming Cities Fund early next year.

“This addition to the existing active travel schemes in Harrogate demonstrates our commitment to encouraging sustainable transport to ease congestion and to improve air quality,” said County Councillor Don Mackenzie, Executive Member for Access.

“Like the trial on Beech Grove, we look forward to receiving the views of residents during the course of this experimental order. Those views will be taken into account as part of an ongoing review of the scheme.”

The proposal is intended to simplify traffic movements at the junction between Victoria Road and Otley Road and to improve safety. Vehicles will be prevented from leaving Victoria Road on to Otley Road.

Existing parking restrictions in the area will remain, a barrier will be placed at the junction, and one-way only and no entry signs will be installed.

Victoria Road will continue to be accessible to residents, their visitors, deliveries, emergency vehicles, refuse collections and taxi / private hire vehicles.

Local member Councillor Richard Cooper said: “A large proportion of greenhouse gases come from transport which is why I support measures such as active travel schemes that encourage or persuade people to leave their cars at home more often.

“Residents’ feedback must be listened to, alongside that from Beech Grove, and I look forward to seeing the effect of the proposals on traffic levels in conjunction with the new cycleway on Otley Road. That feedback needs to be taken over a sensible period once motorists have had chance to get used to the new road priorities.”

A consultation with residents started today (August 13), with a view to the trial beginning in September.

As this is an experimental scheme the public will have a six-month period to share their views. The County Council will then consider whether to make it permanent, extend the experiment or set it aside.

Any comments should be emailed to area6.boroughbridge@northyorks.gov.uk

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Harrogate Hospital and Community Charity – Have you got your tickets for our Summer BBQ? – FLASH SALE

***WIN WIN WIN***

Purchase your tickets before midnight Wednesday 18 August and you could win 2 x Castle Howard Proms 2021 tickets – Saturday 21 August 2021!

Purchase your tickets by clicking on the button below or emailing: hdft.hhcc@nhs.net

If you are looking for an event for you, your friends and family to come together, have fun, relax and celebrate whilst supporting a fantastic local charity – then we have the perfect event for you! Join us for our very special Summer BBQ, Sunday 29 August 2021 at Harrogate Railway Athletic F.C, 12 noon – till late. We have an incredible live music event programme giving a festival vibe, a licensed bar, donkey rides, face painting, an ice cream van and much more! We hope you can join us for a lovely fun filled summers day!

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