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Pateley Bridge

The Oldest Sweet Shop In England – Visit the website here

Business: The Oldest Sweet Shop In England

Location: Pateley Bridge

Description :

The Original Old Sweet Shop

 (Official Guinness World Record!)

The famous Oldest Sweet Shop in the World has been trading continuously since 1827! We are an official World Guinness record holder (Guinness book of records 2014 – The Oldest Sweet Shop in The World) and have appeared on national TV and in the world wide media. It is one of the few authentic traditional old sweet shops still selling retro sweets of a bygone age.

As seen with Paul Hollywood BBC 1, Robbie Coltrane ITV, Nigel Slater BBC, Alan Titchmarsh ITV, BBC Breakfast News Team

As seen in Guinness World Records 2014, National Geographic, Daily Express, Daily mail, Guardian, Independent Telegraph, Good Food Magazine, BBC Olive Magazine and even more! See Here

The Oldest Sweet Shop online has been delivering old fashioned sweetsretro sweet jars & luxury chocolates for over a century and now online for over a decade. We pride ourselves on the quality of our confectionery which is still made to the original recipes dating to the 19th century (boiled in copper pans, the way sweets should be made) we have an unsurpassed knowledge of sweets and chocolates, gained from nearly two centuries of trading experience. Our packaging and presentation is second to none. Importantly we still retain the traditional business values of yesteryear which are today often lost.

We only source the finest products whether that is a black jacks, a pear drop (guaranteed to taste like a proper pear drop!) or the finest box of chocolates -we do not compromise on quality!

Most of all we love sweets and want to share our passion with everybody – enjoy!

Pateley Bridge (known locally as Pateley) is a small market town in Nidderdale in the Borough of Harrogate, North Yorkshire, England. Historically part of the West Riding of Yorkshire, it lies on the River Nidd.

It has the oldest sweet shop in the world. Established in 1827, it is housed in one of the earliest buildings in Pateley Bridge, dating from 1661. Pateley Bridge is also the home of the Nidderdale Museum.

The last Dales agricultural show of the year, the Nidderdale Show, is held annually on the showground by the River Nidd. The show attracts over 14,000 visitors each year.

The town was listed in both the 2017 and 2018 Sunday Times reports on Best Places to Live in northern England.

In the early Middle Ages the site of Pateley lay in lands of the Archbishop of York, which came to be known as Bishopside. In the 12th century the principal settlement in Bishopside was at Wilsill, rather than Pateley. Pateley was first recorded in 1175 (though the document survives in a later copy), as Patleiagate, with 14th century forms including Patheleybrig(ge). The final elements are clear, deriving from Old Norse gata (‘street’) and the northern dialect form brig (‘bridge’) respectively. There is more debate about the Pateley section of the name: the usual explanation is Old English pæþ (‘path’) in the genitive plural form paða + lēah (‘open ground, clearing in a forest’); paða lēah would mean “woodland clearing of the paths”, referring to paths up Nidderdale and from Ripon to Craven, which intersected here.  However, the Pateley name forms competed in the Middle Ages with forms like Padlewath (1227) and Patheslayewathe which could be from Middle English *padil (‘a shallow place in water’) + Old Norse vath (‘ford’) and it could be that they owe something to this name. The local story that the name comes from ‘Pate’, an old Yorkshire dialect word for ‘Badger’, is incorrect.

Pateley Bridge Methodist Church

In 1320 the Archbishop of York granted a charter for a market and fair at Pateley. From the 14th century until the early part of the 20th century, Scotgate Ash Quarry despatched hard-wearing sandstone from its site on the northern flank above Pateley Bridge. When the railway arrived in Nidderdale, the stone was exported by trains and was used in railway platforms, national buildings and harbour walls. Scotgate Ash Quarry closed in 1915.

Until 1964, Pateley Bridge railway station was the terminus of the railway line running up Nidderdale from Nidd Valley Junction, near Harrogate. Between 1907 and 1937, the Nidd Valley Light Railway ran farther up the dale. Access is now by road, with an hourly bus service from Harrogate.

 

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